Cultural Identity

RDF is a secular organization and promotes secularism in all its schools. Cultural activities of all faiths are enthusiastically celebrated in the community. Activities like arts and crafts, performances are celebrated with the school community and villagers too.

Students participating in the Rakhi ritual of
tying a sacred thread around the hand.












Students enacting stories
from Lord Krishna’s life
on Krishnashtami




















Celebrating Ramzaan in
Matendla



















Many RDF students are Lambadis, members of a semi-nomadic tribe whose traditions are in danger of vanishing.  The Lambadis trace their roots to Rajasthan, but today the largest concentration reside in the Indian state of Andra Pradesh. RDF is working to preserve aspects of this unique culture. This is especially exemplified at Rollakal School where students have embraced a new emphasis on playing and dancing to the dappu drums.  The dappu drum is a tambourine -like drum made of goat skin which is beaten with sticks. Five and six year old students at Rollakal are among some of our most talented and enthusiastic dancers of this traditional dance form which originates in the state of Andhra Pradesh.

Through a Rubin Foundation grant, some Kalleda students learnt the mirror embroidery their ancestors used to decorate clothing and today girls are using the techniques in their own homes. Elders entertained students with the ancient practice of storytelling, reciting tribal stories while accompanied by musical instruments like the dholak, tabala and chirutalu. And Lambadi women held dance workshops for students, who then perform the routines for guests.

Additionally, the Youth Empowerment Program has made a video exploring Lambadi culture and why it’s disappearing. RDF’s alumni ambassador, Veeranna Banoth, is a member of the Lambadi tribe.